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Man Booker Shortlist Announced!


On July 26th, this blog announced the Man Booker Longlist titles, and today, we have the shortlist.

The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng (Myrmidon)
 set in post-second world war Malaya.

Swimming Home by Deborah Levy (And Other Stories)
– in which a young woman entangles herself in the life of an English poet and his family in the south of France.

Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel (Fourth Estate)
– sequel to Man Booker prize-winning Wolf Hall.

The Lighthouse by Alison Moore (Salt)
– a man trying to find himself on a walking holiday.

Umbrella by Will Self (Bloomsbury)
– the story of a victim of the sleeping sickness epidemic at the end of the first world war.

Narcopolis by Jeet Thayil (Faber & Faber)
–  set amongst the opium dens of 1970s Mumbai.

Click here to view the shortlist in pictures.

According to the Guardian, “After last year’s controversial focus on ‘readability’, the judges for this year’s Man Booker prize have concentrated on the ‘pure power of prose’ to pick a confident, eclectic shortlist of titles.”

As reported in the Independent, one of the books on the shortlist, Swimming Home by Deborah Levy, was rejected by traditional publishers and only hit the shelves thanks to a publisher which relies on subscriptions from readers.

Chair of the judges, Sir Peter Stothard, editor of the Times Literary Supplement, said: “We loved the shock of language shown in so many different ways and were exhilarated by the vigour and vividly defined values in the six books that we chose – and in the visible confidence of the novel’s place in forming our words and ideas. We were considering all the time novels, not novelists, texts not reputations. We read and we reread. It was the power and depth of prose that settled most of the judges’ debates. […] Without the renewal of English the novel does nothing very much.”

The winner will be revealed at a ceremony at London’s Guildhall on 16th October. The winner will receive a £50,000 prize, in addition to the £2,500 awarded to all shortlisted writers and, importantly, a huge boost in sales for their work. Last year’s winner, The Sense Of An Ending by Julian Barnes, has sold more than 300,000 print editions in the UK.

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Wolf Hall to be BBC2 Drama


After the success of the Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning ITV show Downton Abbey, it seems BBC2 is following suit with the promise of a new production of Hilary Mantel’s Man Booker Prize-winning Wolf Hall and her new novel Bring Up the Bodies.

It will be adapted by Peter Straughan, the man who brought Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy to the big screen. Wolf Hall, a novel charting the rise of Tudor politician Thomas Cromwell, will become a six-part series for BBC2. It is expected to be broadcast in late 2013.

As reported yesterday by the Guardian, the third part of Mantel’s Tudor trilogy, the yet-to-be-published The Mirror and the Light, might form a standalone drama at a later date.

Stressing the channel’s commitment to drama in the face of cuts that from the new year will ravage the daytime schedule, BBC2 controller Janice Hadlow – who named Wolf Hall as among her favourite books of recent years – said the novels were “right in the cross hairs of what BBC2 viewers will enjoy”.

“I think there is a cumulative, mounting hunger for the [dramas] that we do,” said Hadlow. “That doesn’t mean that all of them will be massive audience drivers but I think what drama injects into the channel is of such value … something so powerful that you’d want to protect that at all costs.”

Other new dramas for BBC2, which will air Tom Stoppard’s eagerly awaited adaptation of Parade’s End starring Benedict Cumberbatch tonight at 9pm, include spy thriller The Honourable Woman by Hugo Blick, who wrote and directed the channel’s recent opinion-splitting drama “The Shadow Line”.

Hadlow also spoke about BBC adaptations of Shakespeare and French and Russian classics — for more, see here.

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Irvine Welsh slams the Man Booker Prize



Irvine Welsh
has spoken out against the Man Booker Prize during his appearance at the Edinburgh International Book Festival this week. As reported by the Bookseller, Welsh maintained that the Prize is “based on the conceit that upper-class Englishness is the cultural yardstick against which all literature must be measured”:

Giving the keynote speech at the session on nationalism on the third day of the conference yesterday (19th August), Welsh said the winners of the Man Booker Prize have alternated between “largely upper-middle-class English writers and citizens of the former colonies, presumably to stamp legitimacy on this ‘global accolade'”. He said the failure of the Man Booker Prize organisers to respond to accusations of anti-Scottishness indicated that “the Booker apologists simply have no arguments to refute these observations. Hegemony not only breeds arrogance; it also promotes intellectual enfeeblement.”

He added: “The Booker Prize’s contention to be an inclusive, non-discriminatory award could be demolished by anybody with even a rudimentary grasp of sixth-form sociology. The academics who are custodians of the prize however, can only offer bland and complacent corporate PR speak in defence of an award based on the conceit that upper-class Englishness is the cultural yardstick against which all literature must be measured.”

Welsh was speaking at the conference as part of the Book Festival held to mark the 50th Anniversary of the infamous 1962 Edinburgh World Writers’ Conference. See more here.

For the list of Man Booker Longlist authors, see here.

*Edit*:To read Sam Jordison’s rebuttal in the Guardian, click here.

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John Banville to Regenerate Raymond Chandler’s Detective Philip Marlowe


Raymond Chandler, the great American novelist and screenwriter, passed away in 1959, leaving behind him some of the most influential prose in history, a legacy that would impact the Coen Brothers, Paul Auster, Quentin Tarantino, Haruki Murakami to name a few. Chandler is famous for his hardboiled suspense novels, and their subsequent film adaptations, notably Humphrey Bogart’s portrayal of  L.A. Detective Philip Marlowe in films like The Big Sleep.

John Banville — Irish writer born in 1945 — is, according to the British Council, “a philosophical novelist concerned with the nature of perception, the conflict between imagination and reality, and the existential isolation of the individual.” His novel The Sea won the Man Booker Prize in 2005. He also has a crime fiction pen name, Benjamin Black, under which he has written five detective novels.

Yesterday, GalleyCat announced that Banville is to bring back Chandler’s L.A. Detective in a new novel following a press release from the Benjamin Black website. Banville will write the new novel under his pseudonym — this was confirmed by his editor, John Sterling. The book will be written under an arrangement with the Chandler estate, and the US Macmillan imprint Henry Holt will publish the book in 2013.

Along with Marlowe, Banville will bring back policeman Bernie Ohls, “the gumshoe’s good friend”. The book will have an original plot and take place in the 1940s. The setting will remain in Bay City – Chandler’s fictional stand-in for Santa Monica, California – and feature Chandler’s hallmark noir ambience. Banville promises to create a “slightly surreal, or hyper-real, atmosphere” for the novel, exploring some of Marlowe’s Los Angeles.

Banville said: “I love the challenge of following in the very large footsteps of Raymond Chandler. I began reading Chandler as a teenager, and frequently return to the novels. This idea has been germinating for several years and I relish the prospect of setting a book in Marlowe’s California, which I always think of in terms of Edward Hopper’s paintings. Bay City will have a slightly surreal, or hyper-real, atmosphere that I look forward to creating.”

According to Banville’s editor, John Sterling, “John Banville writing as Benjamin Black recreating Raymond Chandler is a perfect literary hand-off. There is no one better to bring Philip Marlowe back to life for the vast readership that loves noir crime fiction.”

Sterling acquired first serial, electronic and audio rights for the book in the United States and Canada from Ed Victor of Ed Victor Ltd. Victor represented both Banville and the Chandler estate in the negotiation. As outlined by the Bookseller, there is yet no word about the book’s publication in the UK, where Banville is represented by Pan Macmillan.

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Extracts from titles on Man Booker Longlist

GalleyCat has provided online extracts from the 12 Man Booker Longlist titles, so for all of you who haven’t heard of these authors or know what they’re about, simply click the links below!

 

Free Samples of the 2012 Man Booker Prize Longlist

Nicola Barker for The Yips

Ned Beauman for The Teleportation Accident

Andre Brink for Philida (No sample available online)

Tan Twan Eng for The Garden of Evening Mists 

Michael Frayn for Skios 

Rachel Joyce for The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry 

Deborah Levy for Swimming Home 

Hilary Mantel for Bring up the Bodies 

Alison Moore for The Lighthouse (PDF link)

Will Self for Umbrella

Jeet Thayil for Narcopolis

Sam Thompson for Communion Town

 

The shortlist will be announced on the 11th of September, and the lucky winner(s?) will be named on the 16th of October.

 

Courtesy of GalleyCat.

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Man Booker Prize Longlist Announced!

Today the longlist for this year’s Man Booker Prize winner was announced. Much mixed feedback has come back, such as this article from the Telegraph and this from the BBC, as it seems that the longlist (of just 12 titles out of an initial 145) is in favour of new writers and small independent publishers.

Tom Tivnan, features editor of The Bookseller, told The Independent: “It’s a nice mix of young gunslingers and some of the old guard. It’s a bit more literary than last year.”

The longlist titles are as followed:

The Yips by Nicola Barker (Fourth Estate)
The Teleportation Accident by Ned Beauman (Sceptre)
Philida by André Brink (Harvill Secker)
The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng (Myrmidon)
Skios by Michael Frayn (Faber & Faber)
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce (Doubleday)
Swimming Home by Deborah Levy (And Other Stories)
Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel (Fourth Estate)
The Lighthouse by Alison Moore (Salt)
Umbrella by Will Self (Bloomsbury)
Narcopolis by Jeet Thayil (Faber & Faber)
Communion Town by Sam Thompson (Fourth Estate)

Each one is given a brief outline and introduction here.

Peter Stothard, chairman of the judges, said:

“Goodness, madness and bewildering urban change are among the themes of this year’s longlist. In an extraordinary year for fiction the ‘Man Booker Dozen’ proves the grip that the novel has on our world. […] We did not set out to reject the old guard but, after a year of sustained critical argument by a demanding panel of judges, the new has come powering through.”

The shortlist will be announced on 11th September and the winner of the £50,000 prize on 16th October.

According to the poll in the Telegraph, Hilary Mantel is set for a sure-fire second Man Booker Prize. Who would your favourite be?

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