Tag Archives: self-publishing

Out of the Bag by Sean Maguire

sean maguire cover

 

 

Poetry has been the outlet that Sean has used to express himself since he was nine years old. Born in England to Irish immigrant parents, Sean experienced what he believes to be religious indoctrination and miss-education. Poetry helped him deal with the frustration of what he saw as a society perpetrated and controlled by a mainstream media. These early poems were not lost to time, they were saved and some are still performed if you ask Sean to do so.

Later in life, Sean performed his poetry at many events, usually charity ones. He kept being asked by his listeners if he had a book that they could buy and later read. The same happened when he read his work on his own radio show. This is a radio show with the same title as the poetry collection Out of the Bag. It takes place every Wednesday night from 9pm to midnight on MSI Radio and covers a diverse range of topics highlighting the “psychopaths that “rule” this planet”.

Over the years Sean has interviewed many authors who suggested that he self-publish his poetry. Some of these authors recommended that he use the services of selfpublishbooks.ie after they were happy with the service, or know others that were.

His poetry is inspired by his experiences throughout his life. The people that he has met on his radio show, his background in the punk rock scene and being a child of immigrants in England. After writing for nearly all his life he still does not have a poem that he would call his favourite. He managed to narrow down his 200 plus poems down to a collection of 48 for his book. However, he carries the rest of his poetry around with his to the gigs in a bag which is featured on the cover.

Sean found the self-publishing experience to be relatively painless and now sells his books after his gigs. He has received great feedback from everyone who has purchased them and is happy to report that they are “now flying all over the world”.

Due to his good experience with selfpublishbooks.ie, Sean is looking forward to working with us again in the future and has already recommended us to other potential authors.

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An Taoiseach launches book by Cork Senator.

a cry in the morning cover

An Taoiseach Enda Kenny has launched, A Cry in the Morning – The Global Search for Sanotic Koniste written by Senator John Gilmore. As the Taoiseach was late for the event, Senator Mary Louise O’Donnell said a few words before introducing John Gilroy to the audience.

Fine Gael and Labour were delighted to combine forces for this event which took place in the private member’s restaurant in Leinster House on July 18th 2013.

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The book tells the story of the murder of Sanotic Koniste, the Japanese servant on the Clifton Lodge Estate near Athboy in Co. Mayo. He met a lonely death, ten thousand miles from his home in 1913. Having grown up at a seaport in Japan, lived through an Alaskan winter, survived after being abandoned to die in the American wilderness and after having hunted lions on the African plains, Athboy was as unlikely a place for him to meet his death as he could have imagined.

But murder was not the final insult to Sanotic Koniste. Civil wars, earthquakes, American bombing raids and volcanoes all conspired to make sure that even his name would be erased from the pages of history.

John Gilroy searched all four corners of the globe – Japan, WashingtonState and Botswana to piece together this murder mystery and present it to a modern audience.

Fiach MacConghail, Director of the Abbey Theatre said that John Gilmore: “has written a fascinating story, wonderfully researched. Well worth a read.”

Senator John Gilroy received media attention in the days following the launch – giving attention, publicity and praise for the book and the research that he undertook. However, the focus has been on the Fine Gael Leader launching the book instead of the Labour Party Leader Eamon Gilmore. Mr Gilmore and Pat Rabbit did not attend the launch but other members of the Labour Party did and praised the Senator. John Gilroy did not want the event to be a political matter.

 Piece by The Irish Times

Piece by The Independent

The book was produced by www.selfpublishbooks.ie in Cork and the author was delighted with the service. “Frank and the staff at Lettertec provided an excellent service. The quality of my book was exceptional, everyone commented on this – it certainly helped increase sales. The turn around time was fantastic as well, friendly staff, professional service, I’m delighted.

Attached is a picture of Senator John Gilroy on the left, Taoiseach Enda Kenny in the middle and Lettertec Director Frank Kelly on the right.

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Magazine admires the power behind Lettertec and Selfpublishbooks.ie

Magazine admires the power behind Lettertec and Selfpublishbooks.ie

 

Frank Kelly, Director of Letterec Ireland and the subsidiary Selfpublishbooks.ie was recently interviewed by Maeve Martin of Irish Printer Magazine.

 

print magazine

 

The following is an extract of the article.

 

It is easy to claim that your portfolio of equipment is streets ahead of your competitors. But Lettertec Ireland Ltd can actually back up their claims about the range, quality and uniqueness of the bindery equipment they have installed. Managing director Frank Kelly talks to Maeve Martin about how he is beating the recession by making state-of-the-art and strategic investment.

 

“Our portfolio of bindery equipment is second to none,” says Frank. “We had Print and Packaging Forum director Kevin Byrne at our premises recently and he was amazed by our portfolio. No one in the printing trade is investing the wayLettertec is. Our Watkiss Power Square Stitcher was the only one in the country for the past five years until recently when Modern Printers in Kilkenny invested in one. And no printer in the UK or Ireland has the configuration of our Wohlenberg 5 Clamp Binder for cold glue binding.”

 

Lettertec’s bindery department also operates an automatic casemaker forhard cover book production, a casing in machine, and a Perfecta three-knife trimmer. “All of our equipment has been purchased in the last two to three years so it is the most modern, efficient, and accurate available, as well as being at the top end of the quality spectrum,” he says. “I am a big fan of German equipment and engineering. We initially purchased the aforementioned equipment for our own work but if a commercial printer wants to have either complete lie flat books, cold glue bound for added strength, or printed books case bound, we can do it for him. Kavanaghs bookbinders in Dublin, for instance, will gather, thread sew, add end papers and trim book blocks for us to case in. So if the printer sends his books to Kavanaghs and his cover material to ourselves, we can make the cases with absolute accurate registration, and when the trimmed book blocks arrive in we can case them in. It is all automatic or semiautomatic equipment so there is no hand work and therefore the job is processed through much more quickly and with extreme accuracy. For instance, actual run times, not rated times, are as follows: we can bind 850 to 900 books per hour on the Wohlenberg, make 1,200 cases per hour on the casemaker, and then case in at a rate of 500 books per hour. To the best of my knowledge, there is nothing in the country to touch that throughput in terms of case bound books.”

 

Is trade work an aspect of Lettertec’s business that they are keen to build  up?

 

“‘We are getting practically no trade work as we have not sought it,” saysFrank. “However, we recently took in a job from a colleague who knows about our paperback binding capability. The job had 500 pages of content and a 35mm spine, which was too wide for the printer’s own Horizon 4 clamp perfect binder, so we Ota bound it and cold glued it. The client was delighted with the complete lie flat that we achieved on such a big book and, as a result,another job was delivered recently. There is a quick turnaround and low margin as well as other problems associated with trade work but we would certainly be willing to engage with other printers who could provide regular work and appreciated what we have and can do for them”.

 

Unique Binding Technologies The Wohlenberg 5 Clamp Binder runson cold glue with an Ota-Bind facility so it will ‘perfect bind’ books withgauze or mull around the spine. “This gives added strength to the bookblock and allows the book to “swivel” in the spine,” ‘says Frank. “The base of the book block never touches the spine, unlike hot melt perfect bound books. This gauze is hidden in the cover of the perfect bound book, and if there is no drawn on cover, we just send it over to be case bound. The ‘pull strength’ of our books has been measured by Henkel laboratories and is almost three times the minimum UK standard. To my knowledge, no other machine can offer that strength of bind. The Wohlenberg 5 Clamp Binder scores the drawn on cover in six positions, as opposed to four for a normal binder, it adds the mull or gauze, and then the book is securely bound. The spine of the book never creases, no matter how many times you open and close it, because the bookblock is ‘swivelling’ in the spine. The binder can bind 850 to 900 books per hour, depending on spine thickness. In that configuration it was a considerable investment at Stg £250,000 but it does what it says on the tin! We used to have a Kolbus DA36 back in the nineties but our new fully automatic casemaker has practically no make ready at all so it is ideal for short runs, and it is also deadly accurate. It also runs faster than the old Kolbus.” Book Printing and Publishing Book printing and publishing is a bigpart of Lettertec”s business and they have a separate dedicated website for this side of their operation – http://www.selfpublishbooks.ie. The company started offering the book printing service about three years ago as an adjunct to the main business and it has been very succesful for them. “Given the type of product we provide, secure lay flat binding with the option for small runs of case bound ‘coffee table’ type books, we do not have any real competition in our space on the printing side,'”he says. “Of course any printer with a half decent digital press and a hot melt perfect binder can produce a paperback book but there is nobody on the island of Ireland doing what we do. In fact a few weeks ago, we had visitors who flew over from the UK to see the Wohlenberg, as there are only three of these in the British Isles, ours being one, and the other two do not have our configuration. On the publishing side there is far more competition and the pity is that a lot of these companies are sending the work out of this country. I have great admiration for Dr Kevin Byrne and the Print and Packaging Forum and for what they are trying to achieve with the PrintIrish license and brand. It seems crazy that we have big binding companies flying in from the UK to see what we have here in Cork and, in the meantime, the work is going over there.” The company’s self publishing service offers a cradle to grave solution, from a template in which to start typing, through to editing, proofing and formatting, to the finished books. “A typical order might be 300 paperbacks with 50 hard bound copies for a book launch for friends and family,” says Frank. “We can run mono on our brand new Nuvera 144 from Xerox but we can also print colour or add colour pages using the latest Xerox technology with EA toners to give a completely ‘flat’ look to the colour images.”

On the general printing side

Lettertec’s range of equipment means they can supply anything from a leather bound, foil blocked and titled log book or registry book, to a full colour (with variable data) promotional piece for a marketing agency. “We have a Pfaffle automatic puncher for wire binding reports, a Heidelberg SM 52 for general stationery work, two guillotines plus the three knife trimmer, two foil blocking machines, two laminators, a small platen, five Xerox digital production engines, and much more!’ says Frank. “We also have online ordering software which allows our clients to log in, make artwork changes to PDFs on line and place orders, as well as view their transaction history.”

 

Future Growth & Investment

“I see future growth coming from the publishing side of the business right now,” says Frank. “We are always updating the ‘bucket list’ of machines that we would like to have so we are planning further investment over the next 12 months. I am optimistic about the future of our own company. There are challenges out there, such as new technologies like iPads, Kindles, e-Booksetc, but there will always be something new around the corner. You just have to find your particular niche or USP and develop that. If you do good work, people will find you.”

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The Parting by Patrick Stack

The Parting

Patrick Stack started writing at 12 after hearing a piece of verse on the black and white TV. Now he has written a full collection of poetry with Selfpublishbooks.ie - this week we asked him to share his experience.

“I’ve always had a love for the sound of language,” Patrick says. “As a child and teenager I would regularly take down one of the four volumes of The Imperial Dictionary of the English Language from the shelf in our living room and read it. This had belonged to my paternal grandfather who died when my father was 7 or 8 years old. I was enthralled by the little lithographs scattered throughout its pages to illustrate some obscure word, and fascinated by the etymological information in each entry. I was the only one who ever consulted it, and was given it to keep by my parents when I left home. My love of language has lead me speaking five languages with varying degrees of fluency. I intend learning a sixth – Korean – when time permits. It has also lead, albeit indirectly, to my working in the field of web and database programming, where I use computer languages such as html, css, php, JavaScript, and SQL.”

A poet has to take direction from other authors — we asked Patrick who he named as his idols.

“That’s a difficult one! My favourite poets during my formative period at Trinity were William Blake, Arthur Rimbaud, Gerard de Nerval, Guillaume Appolinaire, and Paul Eluard.
“Later on I developed a love for the Argentinian writer and poet, Jorge Luís Borges – I especially liked his short poems, but didn’t much like his longer more descriptive stuff.
“The minimalist poetry of Thomas McGreevey inspires me, as does Michael Hartnett’s Irish language poetry.”

How long was The Parting in the works? How did it begin?

“The Parting has been in the works for a long time. I have wanted to publish my own collection since I was an undergraduate in Trinity in the late 1970s, but back then there was no such thing as self-publishing (unless you count vanity publishing which was costly) and getting a poem published – never mind a collection – was a daunting prospect.
“Over the years I’ve produced several collections which, thankfully, never saw the light of day. The Parting is a compilation of the best poems that have survived from these, as well as my most recent work. The early surviving poems have undergone varying degrees of paring, pruning and gutting. One, ‘Tricolour’, has grown from a fragment (6 lines) written in 1989 shortly after I emigrated to Spain, to its final 57-line version completed in 2008 well after I had returned to Ireland.
“Coming up with an appropriate title for the collection proved a major stumbling block. With help from my daughter I eventually settled upon The Parting, given that the collection deals with many types of parting.”

Patrick is on the committee for the Three-Legged Stool Poets – we asked him how he got involved.

“The committee that runs the the Three-Legged Stool Poets has just decided to rename it 3-Legged Stool Poets, so I’ll refer to it as that from now on. It was started back in the early 2000s and came out of another group called ‘The Poetry Collective’ which was the brainchild of Arthur Watson. Arthur is still actively involved.
“Soon after I emigrated to Spain I stopped writing, and did not start again until early 2007 – a period of 16 years in the wilderness as it were! As I had not been writing or even reading poetry in all that time, I was unaware of the existence of any poetry groups in the Munster area. In 2007, I gave my first reading in 20 years in the Georgian House, Limerick as part of the Mozart and Wine fundraising night run by Summer Music on the Shannon. Although I was terrified, the reading proved to be a huge success. Barney Sheehan of the Whitehouse Poetry Revival was in the audience, and asked me to come and read at the Whitehouse, which I subsequently did. During that reading I happened to mention that I had been trying unsuccessfully to make contact with the 3-Legged Stool Poets, which I had been told about by somebody in Ennis. Unbeknownst to me, Brian Mooney happened to be there that night and came up and introduced himself. That’s how I came to join the group.
“Through my contacts in Summer Music on the Shannon, the group secured a regular monthly reading in Glór, Ennis in 2008 and that initiative is still going.”

Every poet has a favourite poem. We asked Patrick which poem he enjoyed writing most in The Parting and why?

“The first one that comes to mind is ‘Dog Burial’, followed closely by ‘Epithalamion.’ ‘Dog Burial’ has been around a long time, the first version dating back to 1979. It was written in memory of a greyhound, Millie, who was my mother’s favourite of all the greyhounds we kept, hence the dedication. Many re-writings later, it has achieved that terseness and minimalism which best expresses the grief of losing Millie and having to bury her in the orchard.
“In contrast, Epithalamion took only a few months to write, and has none of the terseness or minimalism of ‘Dog Burial.’ Instead it luxuriates in its richness of language. Writing it proved a major challenge. I was still frantically working on it in the car on the way to the wedding, and only completed it half an hour before the wedding reception at which I read it!”

Once a book is finished, the next step is to get it between two covers. But what caught Patrick’s interest in self-publishing?

“Getting a collection published by a ‘reputable’ publisher in Ireland is very difficult. And even if your work is accepted by one, the waiting time can be counted in years. An added complication for me is that my poetry is not mainstream and, I suspect, does not tick the necessary boxes to satisfy the status quo’s ideas of what constitutes acceptable poetry.
“Having acquired the skills necessary to do page layout through my years as a Desktop Publishing tutor for Clare VEC, I decided I would do just that. Some research on the web lead me to Lettertec’s website. I liked what I saw and made contact.”

We asked Patrick how he found the self-publishing process:

“The process of putting the book together was daunting, and proved to be a lot of work once I started,” Patrick says, “I used my web developer skills to help select from the 113 poems I have in an online database I set up for the purpose, and to put them in order. I adapted a jQuery re-order plugin which I attached to the database to help in getting them into the right order. This took about three weeks to do. I then used an open source Page layout program – Scribus – to put the collection together. This took about 2 months.
“The least daunting, most efficient part was the production of the finished book. All I had to do was deliver the pdfs to selfpublishbooks.ie and they did the rest. I was amazed to get delivery of the book a week ahead of schedule. That is great service!

“The finished product is excellent in every way. It is as I had imagined, only better. There is nothing to compare with the feeling of reading from your own book – it gives a feeling of confidence, of completion. It beats the hell out of reading from notebooks, loose sheets and the backs of envelopes!”

So what’s next for Patrick?

“As an active member of 3-Legged Stool Poets, I’m excited at our upcoming initiative to plunge into performance poetry for our Winter season which kicks off in October 2013.
“Besides promoting The Parting through readings and Social Media, and my website, my next project is to finish the long poem entitled ‘The Day the Revolution Came,’ which I’ve been working on for the last four years. Currently I’m about half-way through at 215 lines in 4 cantos. Once finished I will publish it as a standalone work, though the title may well change!”

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Book Promotion Strategies — That Actually Work

What’s the best book promotion strategy you’ve ever seen?

Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian took to Reddit to seek promotion advice for his new book, Without Their Permission: How the 21st Century Will Be Made, Not Managed.

He asked the network of loyal readers: “What are some of the smartest things you’ve seen people do to promote a book? … I’d like to make the most out of all this time I have to do some awesome stuff for the fine folks who’d pre-order/buy a copy.”

We’ve collected ten reader responses below to help you plan your own book promotion.

 

Book Promotion Strategies That Actually Worked

1. oguerrieri wrote: “Definitely offer free e-book with purchase of hard copy! Something I wish every book did.”

2. JoanofLorraine wrote: “My favorite example is the writer who opened a storefront in Brooklyn that sold only copies of his own book.”

3. josephflaherty wrote: “The little things Field Notes does, like putting in a themed patch or button goes a long way to making their books feel more like cultural artifacts than indie Moleskines.”

4. HAGOODMANAUTHOR wrote: “Advertising on Reddit has increased my Kindle sales exponentially”

5. josephflaherty added: “Put it in a crazy package: Seth Godin put copies of his books in Milk/Cereal boxes which made them really stand out and feel more like limited edition products than books.”

6. Davytron wrote: “when i worked at a book store, these ladies gave every employee a copy of their cook book. A bunch of us used the recipes and ended up telling customers and family about them. It was very nice but also a clever way to get us to promote their book.”

7. Thestom wrote: “Free book of equal or lesser value with the purchase of the author’s book.”

8. josephflaherty also added: “I’m sure you’ve got the book tour part dialed in, but treating them more like concerts would be fascinating … Would be fun for a tour to host a few local entrepreneurs who have succeeded without permission.”

9. Ms Adler wrote: “doing a discount on ebooks will often get you more readers that may not otherwise purchase a hard copy, and signed first editions are prized by collectors.”

10. Ginroth concluded: “Writing a good book.”

 

Reblogged in full from Jason Boog at Galleycat

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Mirrors Don’t Tell Lies

 

Mirrors Don't Tell Lies A5 Cover

Joe Clarke, golfer, traveller, fisher, has always had a healthy fascination with the written word. His first novel, Mirrors Don’t Tell Lies, has been reprinted this year by Selfpublishbooks.ie and we caught up with the author this week to chat about it.

 

Mirrors Don’t Tell Lies was my first novel,” Joe says, “It caught the bug from talking to another author friend in the States. I set about writing this book almost 5 years ago initially taking 5 months to complete. I have since rewritten it twice adding another 4 months on to this time-frame. With a love for detective movies, crime and the solving of same was always going to be the topic for my book. Pretty much with an open mind, no set agenda, I let my imagination run wild all the time developing the story and introducing characters as it went along. I have changed the original ending adding another chapter in the process.

 

“From my teenage years I had a love for writing although in those days I favoured lyric writing, hoping it would give me my big break but alas it didn’t happen. For a time I also contributed to the Drogheda United match day programme. In the subsequent years following on from my retirement I initially wrote poetry which I still very much love to do.

 

I asked Joe what his favourite part to write was. “Chapter 19,” he says, without a doubt, “when protagonist Tom Doyle who is a much accredited, well-respected retired Scotland Yard detective suddenly gives in to his softer side when he once again, after 5 years, meets up with his only daughter Susan and two grand children Elle and Toby who he knew nothing about.”

 

Sounds intriguing! Joe talked a little about what made him rewrite and reprint this book. “Since I finished the re-write of my first book my family have asked me to publish it but I always felt that the expense simply didn’t justify it. However, when I checked it out I was pleasantly surprised to discover that it wasn’t nearly as expensive as first thought. Having had no prior experience with publishing I adopted a very nervous and cautious approach. Daunting would probably describe the initial phase but with the help and assistance of Sharon, my fears were quickly allayed. As you can imagine it was a big learning curve for me but I must say that I found the whole process a pleasant experience.”

 

I asked Joe what the physical book was like: “The finished product was beyond my expectations and I am obviously most pleased with it.”

 

So what’s next for the mystery writer? “My next publication ‘My Watchmaker’s Time’ is already written and is currently being proofed. I expect to have the final file ready in three weeks and intend to then publish it through Selfpublishishbooks.ie. I then intend to write my third novel but haven’t yet decided on a plot. Watch this space!”

 

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Going to College as a Mature Student

Going to College as a Mature Student

This week, the team at Selfpublishbooks.ie caught up with Denis Staunton. I asked Denis about himself and what may have prompted him to write Going to College as a Mature Student.

“I am originally from Limerick, now living in Cork, married with four grown-up up children,” said Denis, “I have been involved in education at many different levels and in several different contexts for the past thirty-five years. I have worked in the non-formal education sector as a community youth worker, in the in-formal sector as an adult education co-ordinator and in the third-level sector as a lecturer, researcher and policy formation. I know the Irish education system from both the outside and the inside.

“When I left secondary school I knew what I did not want to do but not what I wanted to do. I did not want to work in an ok kind of job, with ok kind of money, in an ok type of office. I felt there was something better out there waiting for me through education. I discovered a ‘thing’ called Sociology and went to UCD as a mature student to study for a degree in Social Science. I loved the challenge of learning and became a lifelong learner.

“Professionally I have worked as a youth work in the inner city of Dublin; Community worker in Donegal with the Combat Poverty Programme; Training Officer with a Community Development Organisation in Cork and for the past twenty five years in University College Cork (UCC) teaching in the Department of Applied Social Studies, Assistant Director (Academic) in the Centre for Adult Continuing Education and Director of Access.

“I have always studied topics related to my work. For example, I completed my Masters in the area of Burnout and Stress among Youth and Community Workers and my PhD was entitled ‘Was it worth it?: The occupational benefits of getting a degree qualification as a Mature Student.’ ”

Where did he get the idea for this book?

“It arose out of the many interviews I carried out with mature students for my PhD Thesis. Reflecting back on their educational journey through college many mentioned the fact that so
much time and stress could have been avoided  (especially in the first year) if they had known more about the academic cultural expectations and the skills and strategies required to become a competent student.
It took me three years to complete. It was hard work but I adopted a simple strategy: no matter what, do an hour every day and write 200
words. It’s amazing how quickly the words add up and after a year a
‘shape’ begins to appear. Year one was given to reading, researching
and drafting (enjoyable part), Year two focused on structure, clarity
and purpose (the self-doubting part), Year three (the really hard
part) was entirely given to rewriting, rewriting and more rewriting.
Receiving written feedback from ‘critical colleagues and friends’ is
essential during the rewriting phase.”

I was curious to know if Denis always enjoyed education. “Yes, love libraries and books. Always reading – even if pottering
around the house or garden I listen to audio CD’s. This allows me
experiment with all sorts of reading material. If I really like one I
can always get copy of book to read at my leisure or study in detail.”

What books or authors inspired him?

“I am more inspired by ideas and certain organisations. However, since
education is my primary interest I have been influenced by
educationalist such as John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Pierre Boudieu,
Malcolm Knowles and Jack Mezirow to mention but a few. I admire the
work of organisation like UNESCO, Amnesty and One in Four.”

Surely there must have been something in particular about this project that attracted him.

“I most enjoyed researching and writing about working with your brain
(chapter 6). Learning how the adult brain works put me in touch with
new research from a number of scientific fields, such as neuroscience,
cognitive science and developmental psychology. Up to a few years ago,
the prevailing notion was that we were born with all of the brain
cells we were ever going to get, and they steadily eroded in a
depressing journey through adulthood and old age. It is now thought
that throughout life, the adult brain is losing connections at the
same time it is creating new connections in the region of the brain
involved in learning. This notion of creating new connections is
called ‘brain plasticity’, namely, the adult brain has the ability to
change its structure and function in response to experience. This is
really good news for adults who return to study as it shows that
intelligence is not fixed but changes as we learn. The popular phrase
‘use it or lose it’ certainly applies to the adult brain.”

What was it about self-publishing that caught his attention?

“The book I wanted to publish was in the middle between purely academic
focused work, on the one hand, and a non-fiction or fiction book for
the general reader on the other. My book was aimed at a particular
audience and even within the field of education mature students
represent a small percentage. Self-publishing, therefore, was an
obvious option, apart altogether from the financial costs involved in
producing a book as well as any financial rewards.

“I certainly did on-line research but in the end opted for a company
near where I live. From my previous experience of working with
publishers and printers being able to visit the site and get to know
the staff personally helps considerably. Lettertec in Cork ticked all
the boxes for me. I got very helpful advice, practical support and a
professional published finished product.

“It worked for me. I was able to get assistance in editing, graphic
design and production quality. This meant that I could bring a
finished product to the university and to work in partnership with
them in bring it to the target audience.”

What’s next for Dr Staunton?

“Right now I am taking time out to reflect and relax before I
decide my next project.”

And we can’t wait!

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